Science Curriculum Overview, 2019-2020

 

Why do we teach Science at Ark BDA?

Students at Ark Burlington Danes study science because it is a fundamental to the way we live and developing our futures.  Scientific knowledge will allow students to solve practical problems, make informed decisions, and have the future potential to develop new technologies.  The scientific mindset that we teach our students will be key to them being able to identify problems, assess those problems and devise solutions to these problems using science knowledge.  These skills will allow them to engage with the world around them, making informed decisions based on science knowledge and principles.

 

The knowledge students have developed will be useful in several different ways and will build up incrementally through the key stages. We will sequence core knowledge to enable deeper student understanding, for example the basic understanding of materials in key stage 2 and why certain materials are used for different purposes. To understanding why fibre glass is a good insulator in KS4 and possibly designing new stem cell treatments or developing new Nano batteries for mobile phones in KS5.

 

It is necessary to teach science and the scientific method to help students develop their reasoning and practical skills. Students that don’t get a science education miss out on the scientific enquiry method: take a question, use evidence to form an explanation, connect that explanation to existing knowledge and communicate that evidence-based explanation.

 

We want students to have those critical thinking skills, problem thinking skills to make decisions.  Problem solving, and critical thinking are two of the most important skills students learn in school.  They are essential to making good decisions that lead to achievement and success during and after school.

 

Science is one of the most important subjects in school due to its relevance to students’ lives and the universally applicable problem-solving and critical thinking it uses and develops.  These are lifelong skills that allow our students to generate ideas, weigh decisions intelligently and even understand the evidence behind decision making.  A science education allows students to make connections to the world around them it is empowers them but also allows them to adapt and have insights to new advances in the scientific world.

 

How do we deliver our Christian values in science?

At Burlington Danes we are proud of our Christian values and we expect all teachers to embed them into their science teaching.  Teachers are tasked with giving our students the confidence and self-belief to lead a happy and fulfilled life by encouraging them to aim high, be brave, be kind and keep learning.

 

Students are encouraged to aim high in science; regardless of their starting position we ask them to target the best possible grade and mark they can in any work they are doing.  2 Corinthians 13:11 states to “aim for perfection” and we embody this in our science lessons.  We have high expectations of all pupils, we create high standards for all and we ensure we have high quality teaching in our science rooms.  Students are taught to always find ways they can improve and better themselves and their understanding of science concepts.  Instilling that skill of not settling and aiming for better will help them in an ever-changing world where you will always need to be better and adaptable.

 

Students need to be brave in science, they have to be able to learn from mistakes like lots of highly respected scientists did in the past. 1 Chronicles 28:20 states David said to Solomon “be strong and courageous and do the work”.  We show students that being brave can be putting your hand up to answer question, being patient when learning new science concepts and not giving up at the first hurdle. Having this skill will enable our students to not be afraid when moving on from BDA and making sure they engage with the world around them.

 

Being kind is an important human value, we expect our students to act kindly, listen carefully and speak sensibly.   Kindness is not simply being nice, its courage and discipline, it should be constant and unchanging.

Ephesians 4:32 states “be kind to one another, tender hearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.”  Scientists have dedicated their lives to scientific work and developing new technologies that help us live a better life. There is nothing kinder than leading a life that will help thousands of people.

 

Students are encouraged to keep learning, we show how scientists of the past and present make mistakes but that it didn’t stop them and they continue to learn to overcome the mistakes they have made.  Proverbs 1:5 states “Let the wise hear and increase in learning, and the one who understands obtain guidance”.

We expect our students to be determined to reach their goals in all areas of their life.  This may not be in science but the skills they have developed in learning science will help them reach their goals in other areas.  Learning science has several advantages; the more science learning they do, the more chance they will be able to make connections building up knowledge to help the world in the future.

 

How do we build core skills and knowledge over time?

Students will already have some knowledge of science before they start key stage 3 which is a crucial time to build science knowledge.  During key stage 1 and 2 science tries to be as hands-on as possible: students are given the opportunities to experience science in the real world.  Units are fun, challenging and intriguing, stimulating children’s curiosity and translating into meaningful experiences.  Hands-on exploration both inside and outside the classroom cement their understanding of important scientific concepts.

 

During key stage 3 students build on the knowledge they have from key stage 1 and 2.  Fundamental topics are introduced such as cells, atoms and forces, these topics continue to be studied throughout key stage 4 and 5. We use engaging lessons, practical work and a real focus on science in their everyday lives to make sure they have the fundamental knowledge to progress.

 

Teachers use low stake quizzes, mini-assessments, homework’s, exam paper questions and mock exams to test students are understanding the material.  Retention of material over time is important to understanding more challenging concepts, and teachers use trackers to monitor pupil progress and identify gaps in student knowledge and make changes to their teaching plans.

Our science teachers are experts in their field and they share their knowledge of the curriculum through different methods, including teacher instruction, presentations, articles, discussions and homework activities.

 

Lessons follow the same format. We activate the learning by hooking students.  It is here we present the new material that students will be learning. We assess the learning using low stake quizzes or multiple-choice activities.  Students continue to build on the knowledge that they have developed in the first phase of the lesson but there is a bigger focus on the why and how.  Students are again assessed on this information by either teacher-designed questions or exam questions depending on the key stage. The final part of the lesson brings everything they have learnt together with a final quiz or a written activity.  Teachers in science monitor students’ progress on activities in lesson by circulating and noting down observations and doing whole class feedback lessons after a topic and mini assessment has been completed.

 

Students are assessed centrally by ARK with ARK common assessments which are sat twice a year: results are sent home and used to change setting arrangements in science. The results of students throughout key stage 3 will enable us to decide who goes on to study separate science and who goes on to do combined science.  Separate science allows students to gain 3 GCSEs in biology, chemistry and physics and combined science allows students to gain 2 GCSEs.  Students who are aiming to do A levels in science are advised to do separate science as more content is covered which directly links to topics in the A level sciences. Academic progress is important when guiding our decisions for separate sciences in key stage 4 and A level in key stage 5 but a good attitude, willingness to work and a desire to move into a scientific field is also looked upon favourably.

 

A level science builds heavily on skills that have been developed from key 2 and 3.  To complete the A level in any of the three sciences students will need to have the necessary practical skills.  We start teaching practical skills in key stage 2 where science is very hands on.  In key stage 3 we introduce the scientific model and try to get students thinking in this format to identify and solve problems.  During key stage 4 students are given a science practical lab book that covers all the practical aspects of science.  They develop a better understanding of the key terms and learn how to use these terms correctly when writing up their science practical’s.  Teachers monitor and mark these lab books checking student progress and understanding.

 

How does the study of science prepare students for life beyond Ark BDA?

Not only will students have a good general knowledge of science when they leave BDA, but they will also have skills that will enable them to function in the world around them.  Practical skills, functioning skills reasoning skills and analysis skills are all embedded throughout the teaching of science and these skills are transferable to the wider world.

Students that have an interest in science will have lots of different avenues open to them. Exciting careers await such as medical sciences, engineering, astrophysics, space technology, marine biology, medical sciences, military sciences, nuclear chemistry, scientific sales, veterinary sciences and many more.

 

Our science course combines relevant, inspiring, practical and challenging work which prepares all students for an ever-changing world.  They may not go on to be a marine biologist or nuclear chemist, but they will have developed skills and expertise to function in whatever career they choose. The ability to identify a problem, the ability to use evidence to try and solve that problem and in some cases base their solutions on science or by using the scientific method.

Science offers a powerful platform for building confidence, developing communication skills and making sense of the world around us, a world that is increasingly being shaped by science and technology.

 

Implementation

 

 

In year 7 and 8 there are 4 science lessons a week, with homework given once a week to consolidate the learning that has been done.  Students are taught in classes based on data from primary school and teachers use their differentiation skills to scaffold and challenge students depending on their ability.

 

In year 9 students receive an extra period of science a week taking it to 5 lessons and they also given one piece of homework a week.  This is usually an exam question or a consolidation activity that will be marked by the teacher and students will have one week to complete it.  Towards the end of year 9 students are streamlined into either separate science where they will study biology, chemistry and physics separately. Or they will do combined science where they study all 3 topics together.  BDA has specialist teachers for separate science and students will be taught by experts in their fields if they go on to do separate science.  The content in separate science is more challenging and it we expect students that do separate science to go on and do an A level in one of the sciences.

 

In year 10 and 11 students that do combined science will have 6 science lessons a week, this will be spilt between doubles and singles, enabling teachers to plan practical lessons and have time to really embed the learning and key objectives in the lesson.  Separate science students will have 9 lessons of science a week, they are shared equally between biology, chemistry and physics, and again they will have a double and a single, allowing teachers to do practical lessons effectively.

Year 12 and 13 students have 7 lessons of their chosen science a week.

 

Lessons in science follow the following format, lessons always start with a ‘do now’ activity that is a recap of previous learning, this could be in the form of a low stakes quiz or a word fill activity, there is a hook that engages the student, and this is the time where new information is presented to the class via teacher talk, reading or a presentation.  Students are assessed on the new information using different assessment for learning strategies including true or false or multiple-choice quizzes.  Students are then given the chance to do some independent work on the information, this could mean answering questions set by the teacher or writing a paragraph that uses several key words in the right context.  The teacher will always produce a model answer and identify gaps in the students learning by listening to answers and reading through work.  Finally, the consolidation activity brings all the learning together and allows students to leave the lesson understanding what the key takeaways are.

 

Topics in science last for a round 2-3 weeks, and at the end of every topic students will be assessed using a mastery quiz in year 7 and 8 or exam questions in year 9 – 11.  The assessments are designed to test what students know and understand, test whether they can apply that knowledge in different contexts and finally their ability to analyse and interpret scientific information. They follow the same format of the AQA exams which are divided into the same strands, A01 – knowledge and understanding, AO2 – applying knowledge, and AO3 – evaluating scientific ideas and information.  We want students to get into the habit of working on these skills from a young age so that they are used to type of questions exams use. Once an assessment has been completed teachers use a fast feedback method to showcase what went well but also focus on what could be improved.  Students receive there papers back with a mark and points of improvement.  The teacher will also take the time to reteach parts of the topic that he or she thinks students did not fully understand.

 

The science curriculum is very content heavy, there is a lot of information that students need to learn and remember.  Therefore, it is recommended that students buy revision guides to help with consolidation homework activities, but the science team have also embedded revisits to topics previously taught.  Do no activities / low stake quizzes / homework tasks can sometimes be a recap of previous teaching.  Take for instance a year 10 student, their homework activity would be work done in year 9 as well as work they had done that week, this retrieval practice allows information to stay in their long-term memory and make it easily accessible when they do their final exams in year 11.

 

Impact

 

 

Students in key 3 – 5 are assessed regularly throughout their time at BDA.  In lessons pupils will self-assess according to the teachers' model answer.  The teacher will do assessment for learning activities that give whole class feedback on a particular topic.

 

The teacher will read through students work and make corrections were necessary.

Students are assessed at the end of every topic in exam conditions, these assessments are marked by the teacher and the students receive a score and a percentage.  Those students that have performed poorly will be given improvement points and then asked to do the assessment again.  During autumn 2 students do a ARK common assessments, these are assessments that all ARK schools do and this gives our teachers an idea of the impact their teaching is having on students.  The second ARK common assessment is during the summer 2 term. 

 

The ARK common assessments allow us to test students understanding of the topics they have studied but also previous topics from previous years.  Take for instance a year 9 pupil sitting an ARK common assessment in year 9 autumn 2.  That assessment will have questions from topics taught in year 7 and 8.  This allows students to constantly revise information that was taught very early on, doing it this way enables students to keep the information in their long-term memory.

All data from these ARK common assessments is shared with students and parents.

 

 

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

 

Year 1

Topic

Everyday materials

Autumn and winter

 

Key question

What is a material?

Why do we have seasons?

 

Content

  • Can I name different materials?
  • Which materials are different objects made from?
  • What are the properties of different materials
  • Can materials have different properties?
  • Which materials are best which job?
  • Can we use properties to group, compare and sort materials
  • What are seasons?
  • What is the weather like in autumn?
  • What happens to plants and animals in autumn?
  • What changes can we see from autumn to winter
  • What us the weather like in winter?
  • What happens in animals in winter?
  •  

 

Assessment

Quizzes

 

 

 

Year 2

Topic

Rocks

Forces and magnets

 

Key question

What is a rock?

What is a force?

 

Content

  • What are rocks and how can they be classified?
  • How do rocks change?
  • What are fossils and who was Mary Anning?
  • How are fossils formed?
  • What is soil made up of?
  • What type of soil absorbs the most water?
  • How does adding different amount of sand to soil affect how quickly water drains through it?

 

  • What are forces?
  • How do objects move on different surfaces?
  • What is a magnet and how do magnets react to each other?
  • What types of objects are magnetic?
  • Which magnets are the strongest?
  • How are magnets used in real-life situations?

 

 

Assessment

Quizzes

Quizzes

 

 

Year 3

Topic

States of matter

Sound

 

Key question

Why are some substances solid, liquid and a gas?

How do we make sounds?

 

Content

  • What are the three states of matter?
  • Can all objects be classified?
  • What affects how quickly solids melt?
  • Do all liquids freeze at the same temperature?
  • How can the rate of evaporation be increased?
  • What is condensation?
  • How does water change state in nature?
  • What is sound and how is it made?
  • How does sound travel?
  • How do we hear ad how can we protect our hearing?
  • What is volume and what changes the volume of a sound?
  • What is pitch and what changes the pitch of a sound?
  • How does distance impact sound?

 

Assessment

Quizzes

Quizzes

 

 

Year 4

Topic

Digestive system and teeth

Electricity

 

Key question

Why do we eat food?

Why is electricity important?

 

Content

  • The digestive system
  • What are the types of teeth?
  • What happens in your stomach?
  • What happens in your intestines?
  • Appliances that use electricity
  • Series circuit
  • Naming components
  • What is a switch?
  • Conductors and insulators

 

Assessment

Quizzes

Quizzes

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

Year 7

Topic

  • Intro to lab science
  • Cells
  • Particle model

 

  • Forces and springs
  • Atoms elements and compounds

 

  • Sound and the wave equation
  • Human skeleton and the respiratory system

 

  • Chemical reactions
  • Light and the eye

 

  • Reproduction in animal and plants

 

  • Acids and alkalis
  • Space

Key question

Identify the principle features of a cell and describe their functions

Sort elements using chemical data and relate this to their position in the periodic table

Investigate factors that affect the size of frictional or drag forces

Compare the properties of elements with the properties of a compound formed from them

Relate changes in the shape of an oscilloscope trace to changes in pitch and volume

Investigate a claim linking height to lung volume

Investigate changes in mass for chemical and physical processes

Use ray diagrams to model how light passes through lenses and transparent materials

Relate advice to pregnant women to ideas about transfer of substances to the embryo

Devise an enquiry to compare how well indigestion remedies work

Relate observations of changing day length to an appropriate model of the solar system

Content

Introduction to laboratory science

  • Introduction to laboratory science
  • Using a Bunsen burner

Cells

  • Microscopes
  • Animal and plant cells
  • Practical lesson – Observing cells
  • Specialised cells
  • Diffusion
  • Unicellular organisms

The particle model

  • States of matter
  • The particle model
  • Melting and freezing
  • Boiling
  • More changes of state
  • Diffusion
  • Practical lesson – diffusion
  • Gas pressure

 

Forces and springs

  • Identifying forces
  • Representing forces
  • Stretching and squashing
  • Drag and friction
  • Practical lesson – friction
  • Forces at a distance
  • Balancing forces

Atoms, elements and compounds

  • Elements
  • Atoms
  • Compounds
  • Practical lesson – Iron sulphide
  • Chemical formulas

Sound and the wave equation

  • Sound and energy transfer
  • Waves
  • Practical lesson – speed of sound
  • Loudness and pitch
  • Detecting sound
  • Echoes and ultrasound

Human skeleton and the respiratory system

  • Levels of organisation
  • Gas exchange
  • Breathing
  • The skeleton
  • Joints
  • Muscles
  • Practical lesson – muscle fatigue

Chemical reactions

  • Chemical reactions
  • Word equations
  • Burning fuels
  • Practical lesson – energy in fuels
  • Thermal decomposition
  • Conservation of mass
  • Endothermic and exothermic reactions

Light and the eye

  • Light
  • Practical lesson – law of reflection
  • Reflection
  • Refraction
  • The eye and the camera
  • colour

Reproduction in animals and plants

  • Adolescence
  • Reproductive systems
  • Fertilisation and implantation
  • Development of a fetus
  • Menstrual cycle
  • Flowers and pollination
  • Fertilisation and seed dispersal
  • Germination

 

Acids and alkalis

  • Acids and alkalis
  • Indicators
  • Universal indicator and pH scale
  • Neutralisation
  • Uses of neutralisation
  • Making salts
  • Practical lesson – making salts

Space

  • The night sky
  • The solar system
  • The Earth
  • Moon
  • Practical lesson – scale of the solar system

Assessment

Mastery quiz

In class assessment

Mastery quiz

ACA

Mastery quiz

In class assessment

Mastery quiz

ACA

Mastery quiz

In class assessment

Mastery quiz

ACA

 

Year 8

Topic

  • Health and lifestyle
  • Periodic table
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Separation techniques
  • Ecosystems an life processes
  • Metals and acids
  • Energy stores and transfers
  • Adaptations, inheritance and variation
  • Motion and pressure
  • Earth

Key question

Evaluate how well a model represents key features of the digestive system

Sort elements using chemical data and relate this to their position in the periodic table

Explore the magnetic field pattern around different types or combinations of magnets

Devise ways to separate mixtures, based on their properties Know

Use a model to investigate the impact of changes in a population of one organism on others in the ecosystem

Use experimental results to suggest an order of reactivity of various metals

Explain the energy transfers in a hand-crank torch

Model the inheritance of a specific trait and explore the variation in the offspring produced

Investigate how pressure from your foot onto the ground varies with different footwear

Model the processes that are responsible for rock formation and link these to the rock features

Content

Health and lifestyle

  • Nutrients
  • Food tests
  • Unhealthy diet
  • Energy content of food
  • The digestive system
  • Bacteria and enzymes in digestion
  • Practical lesson – amylase action
  • Drugs
  • Alcohol
  • Smoking

The periodic table

  • Metals and non-metals
  • Groups and periods
  • Group 1 elements
  • Group 7 elements
  • Practical lesson – displacement
  • Group 0 elements
  •  

Electricity and magnetism

  • Static electricity
  • Circuits
  • Current
  • Models of electricity
  • Potential difference
  • Series and parallel
  • Practical lesson – current and potential difference
  • Resistance
  • Magnets and magnetic fields
  • Electromagnets
  • Using electromagnets

Separation techniques

  • Mixtures
  • Solutions
  • Solubility
  • Filtration and evaporation
  • Evaporation and distillation
  • Chromatography
  • Practical lesson – chromatography

Ecosystems and life processes

  • Photosynthesis
  • Practical lesson – testing for starch
  • Leaves
  • Plant minerals
  • Chemosynthesis
  • Aerobic respiration
  • Anaerobic respiration
  • Food chains and webs
  • Disrupting food chains
  • Ecosystems
  •  

Metals and acids

  • Metals and acid
  • Metals and oxygen
  • Metals and water
  • Practical lesson – reactivity of metals
  • Extracting metals
  • Ceramics
  • Polymers
  • Composites

Energy stores and transfers

  • Food and fuels
  • Conservation of energy
  • Energy and temperature
  • Energy transfer – particles
  • Practical lesson – conduction
  • Energy transfer – radiation
  • Energy resources
  • Energy and power
  • Work, energy and machines
  •  

Adaptations, inheritance and variation

  • Adaptation
  • Competition
  • Variation
  • Practical lesson – plant distribution
  • Continuous and discontinuous
  • Inheritance
  • Natural selection
  • Extinction

Motion and pressure

  • Speed
  • Motion graphs
  • Practical lesson – calculating speed
  • Pressure in gases
  • Pressure in liquids
  • Pressure on solids
  •  

The Earth and atmosphere

  • The Earth and its atmosphere
  • Sedimentary rocks
  • Igneous and metamorphic rocks
  • The rock cycle
  • Practical lesson – modelling the rock cycle
  • The carbon cycle
  • Climate change
  • Recycling

Assessment

Mastery quiz

In class assessment

Mastery quiz

ACA

Mastery quiz

In class assessment

Mastery quiz

ACA

Mastery quiz

In class assessment

Mastery quiz

ACA

 

Year 9

Topic

  • Cell structure and transport
  • Atomic structure and separating techniques
  • Conservation and dissipation of energy
  • Cell division
  • Periodic Table
  • Organisation and the digestive system
  • Structure and bonding
  • Energy transfer by heating
  • Energy resources
  • Organising animals and plants
  • Respiration
  • Chemical changes
  • Electric Circuits
  • Electricity in the home
  • Adaptation, interdependence and competition
  • Molecules and matter

Key question

How do structural differences between types of cells enable them to perform specific functions within the organism?

What is the smallest part of an element and how are these represented?

What are the different stores of energy and how do they interact?

 

How do cells divide and why is the number of chromosomes important?

How are elements ordered on the periodic table?

How do substances travel around our body? How is the digestive system adapted to enable us to gain the nutrients we need?

What are the different types of bonds and how do they affect function?

What is the difference between conduction and convection?

How can we reduce the rate of energy transfer through our homes?

 

How are most of our energy demands met today?

What do fossil fuels do to our environment?

What are the functions of each component of blood?

What is the structure and function of the heart?

How are gases exchanged in the alveoli?

Why is cellular respiration so important?

How do some common metals react with water and dilute hydrochloric acid?

How are metals extracted from ores?

What is direct and alternating current?

What are the names and functions of the different coloured wires in a plug?

What is meant by a stable community?

What do organisms need to survive?

How is density defined and what is its units?

What are the different properties of solids, liquids and gases?

Content

Cell structure and transport

  • The world of the microscope
  • Animal and plant cells
  • Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells
  • Specialisation in animal cells
  • Specialisation in plant cells
  • Diffusion
  • Osmosis
  • Osmosis in plants
  • Active transport
  • Exchanging materials

Atomic structure

  • Atoms
  • Chemical equations
  • Separating mixtures
  • Fractional distillation and paper chromatography
  • History of the atom
  • Structure of the atom
  • Ion, atoms and isotopes
  • Electronic structures

Conservation and dissipation of energy

  • Changes in energy stores
  • Conservation of energy
  • Energy and work
  • Gravitational potential energy stores
  • Kinetic energy and elastic energy stores
  • Energy dissipation
  • Energy and efficiency
  • Electrical appliances
  • Energy and power

 

Cell division

  • Cell division
  • Growth and differentiation
  • Stem cells
  • Stem cell dilemmas

The periodic table

  • Development of the periodic table
  • Electronic structures and the periodic table
  • Group 1 – the alkali metals
  • Group 7 – the halogens
  • Explaining trends
  • The transition metals

Organisation and the digestive system

  •  Tissues and organs
  • The human digestive system
  • The chemistry of food
  • Catalyst and enzymes
  • Factors affecting enzyme action
  • How the digestive system works
  • Making digestion efficient

Structure and bonding

  • States of matter
  • Atoms into ions
  • Ionic bonding
  • Giant ionic structures
  • Covalent bonding
  • Structure of simple molecules
  • Giant covalent structures
  • Fullerenes and graphene

Energy transfer by heating

  • Energy transfer by conduction
  • Infrared radiation
  • More about infrared radiation
  • Specific heat capacity
  • Heating and insulating buildings

 

Energy resources

  • Energy demands
  • Energy from wind and water
  • Power from the sun and the Earth
  • Energy and the environment
  • Big energy issues

Organising animals and plants

  •  The blood
  • The blood vessels
  • The heart
  • Helping the heart
  • Breathing and gas exchange
  • Tissues and organs in plants
  • Transport systems in plants
  • Evaporation and transpiration
  • Factors affecting transpiration

Respiration

  • Aerobic respiration
  • The response to exercise
  • Anaerobic respiration
  • Metabolism and the liver

Chemical changes

  • The reactivity series
  • Displacement reactions
  • Extracting metals
  • Salts from metals

 

  • Salts from insoluble bases
  • Making more salts
  • Neutralisation and the pH scale
  • Strong and weak acids

Electric circuits

  • Electrical charges and fields
  • Current and charge
  • Potential difference and resistance
  • Component characteristics
  • Series circuits
  • Parallel circuits

Electricity in the home

  • Alternating current
  • Cables and plugs
  • Electrical power and potential difference
  • Electrical currents and energy transfer
  • Appliances and efficiency

Adaptation, interdependence, and competition

  • The importance of communities
  • Organisms in their environment
  • Distribution and abundance
  • Competition in animals
  • Competition in plants
  • Adapt and survive
  • Adaptation in animals
  • Adaptation in plants

Molecules and matter

  • Density
  • States of matter
  • Changes of state
  • Internal energy
  • Specific latent heat
  • Gas pressure and temperature
  • Gas pressure and volume

Assessment

Mastery quiz

End of topic tests

Mastery quiz

ACA

Mastery quiz

End of topic tests

Mastery quiz

ACA

Mastery quiz

End of topic tests

Mastery quiz

ACA

 

Year 10

Topic

  • Communicable diseases
  • Preventing and treating diseases
  • Chemical calculations
  • Electrolysis
  • Radioactivity
  • Non-Communicable disease
  • Wave properties
  • Photosynthesis
  • The human nervous System
  • Reproduction
  • Variation and evolution
  • Energy changes
  • Rates and equilibrium
  • Forces in balance 
  • Motion
  • Force and motion
  • Force and pressure
  • Space
  • Crude oil and fuels
  • Organic reactions
  • Polymers

Key question

What is health?

What is a pathogen and how do they cause disease?

How does your immune system work?

What are the stages involved in developing a new drug?

What is meant by relative atomic mass of an element?

How to balance a symbol equation

What happens in electrolysis and what type of substances can be electrolysed?

What is a radioactive substance?

What are the types of radiation given out from a radioactive source?

What is the difference between a transverse and longitudinal wave?

What is meant by a non-communicable disease?

What are the raw materials needed for photosynthesis?

What factors affect the rate of photosynthesis?

Why is it important to control your internal environment?

Why do we need a nervous system?

What makes you different from the rest of your family?

How to distinguish between an exothermic and endothermic reaction?

What is meant by activation energy?

What is the difference between a vector and scalar?

What does Newton’s first law state?

How is speed calculated?

What is the difference between speed and velocity?

How is a motion graph used to determine acceleration?

What is meant by pressure and what is the unit for pressure?

What is crude oil made up from?

What are the products formed when hydrocarbons burn?

How do alkenes react with oxygen in air?

How do you write balanced chemical equations for combustion of alcohols?

What is meant by additional polymerisation?

How do amino acids react together?

What is meant by condensation polymerisation?

Content

Communicable diseases

  • Health and disease
  • Pathogens and disease
  • Growing bacteria in the lab
  • Preventing bacterial growth
  • Preventing infections
  • Viral diseases
  • Bacterial diseases
  • Diseases caused by fungi and protists
  • Human defence responses
  • More about plant diseases
  • Plant defence responses

Preventing and treating disease

  • Vaccination
  • Antibiotics and painkillers
  • Discovering drugs
  • Developing drugs
  • Making monoclonal antibodies
  • Uses of monoclonal antibodies

Chemical calculations

  • Relative masses and moles
  • Equations and calculations
  • From masses to balanced equations
  • The yield of a chemical reaction
  • Atom economy
  • Expressing concentrations
  • Titrations
  • Titration calculations
  • Volume of gases

Electrolysis

  • Introduction to electrolysis
  • Changes at the electrodes
  • The extraction of aluminium
  • Electrolysis of aqueous solutions

Radioactivity

  • Atoms and radiation
  • The discovery of the nucleus
  • Changes in the nucleus
  • More about alpha beta and gamma
  • Activity and half life
  • Nuclear radiation in medicine
  • Nuclear fission
  • Nuclear fusion
  • Nuclear issues

Non-communicable diseases

  • Non-communicable diseases
  • Cancer
  • Smoking and the risk of disease
  • Diet, exercise and disease
  • Alcohol and other carcinogens

Wave properties

  • The nature of waves
  • The properties of waves
  • Reflection and refraction
  • More about waves
  • Sound waves
  • The uses of ultrasound
  • Seismic waves

Photosynthesis

  • Photosynthesis
  • The rate of photosynthesis
  • How plants use glucose
  • Making the most of photosynthesis

The human nervous system

  • Principles of homeostasis
  • The structure and function of the nervous system
  • Reflex actions
  • The brain
  • The eye
  • Common problems of the eye

Reproduction

  • Types of reproduction
  • Cell division in sexual reproduction
  • DNA and the genome
  • Inheritance in action
  • More about genetics
  • Inherited disorders
  • Screening for genetic disorders

Variation and evolution

  • Variation
  • Evolution by natural selection
  • Selective breeding
  • Genetic engineering
  • Ethics of genetic technologies

 

Energy changes

  • Exothermic and endothermic reactions
  • Using energy transfers from reactions
  • Reaction profiles
  • Bond energy calculations

Rates and equilibrium

  • Rate of reaction
  • Collision theory and surface area
  • The effect of temperature
  • The effect of concentration and pressure
  • The effect of  catalysts
  • Reversible reactions
  • Energy and reversible reactions
  • Dynamic equilibrium
  • Altering conditions

Forces in balance

  • Vectors and scalars
  • Forces between objects
  • Resultant forces
  • Centre of mass
  • The parallelogram of forces
  • Resolution of forces

 

Motion

  • Speed and distance-time graphs
  • Velocity and acceleration
  • More about velocity time-time graphs
  • Analysing motion graphs

Force and motion

  • Force and acceleration
  • Weight and terminal velocity
  • Forces and braking
  • Momentum
  • Forces and elasticity

Force and pressure

  • Pressure and surfaces
  • Pressure in a liquid at rest
  • Atmospheric pressure
  • Upthrust and flotation

Space

  • Formation of the solar system
  • The life history of a star
  • Planets, satellites, and orbits
  • The expanding universe
  • The beginning and future of the universe

 

Crude oil and fuels

  • Hydrocarbons
  • Fractional distillation of oil
  • Burning hydrocarbon fuels
  • Cracking hydrocarbons

Organic reactions

  • Reactions of alkenes
  • Structures of alcohols, carboxylic acids, and esters
  • Reactions and uses of alcohols
  • Carboxylic acids and esters

Polymers

  • Additional polymerisation
  • Condensation polymerisation
  • Natural polymers
  • DNA

Assessment

End of topic tests

End of topic tests

ACA

End of topic tests

End of topic tests

ACA

End of topic tests

ACA / Mock exams

 

Year 11

Topic

  • Hormonal coordination
  • Genetics and evolution

 

  • The earth’s resources
  • Electromagnetism
  • Using resources
  • Wave properties
  • Electromagnetic waves

 

Revision and Review

GCSE exams

Key question

What are the main organs of the endocrine system and what is a hormone?

How does insulin control blood glucose concentration?

How are fossils formed?

What are the basic principles for classification?

What are some examples of natural products that are supplemented or replaced by agricultural and synthetic products?

What is the difference between potable water and pure water?

What impact does reuse, reduce and recycle have on our environment?

How can iron be protected from rusting?

Why are some metals alloys?

Why are nitrogen based fertilisers needed to improve crop yields?

 

 

 

Content

Hormonal coordination

  • Principles of hormonal control
  • The control of blood glucose levels
  • Treating diabetes
  • The role of negative feedback
  • Human reproduction
  • Hormones and the menstrual cycle
  • The artificial control of fertility
  • Infertility treatments

Genetics and evolution

  • Evidence for evolution
  • Fossils and extinction
  • More about extinction
  • Antibiotic resistance bacteria
  • Classification
  • New systems of classification

The Earth’s resources

  • Finite and renewable resources
  • Water safe to drink
  • Treating waste water
  • Extracting metal ores
  • Life cycle assessments
  • Reduce, reuse and recycle

Electromagnetism

  • Magnetic fields
  • Magnetic fields of electric currents
  • Electromagnets in devices
  • The motor effect
  • The generator effect
  • The alternating-current generator
  • Transformers
  • Transformers in action

Using resources

  • Rusting
  • Useful alloys
  • The properties of polymers
  • Glass, ceramics, and composites
  • Making ammonia – the haber process
  • The economics of the haber process
  • Making fertilisers in the lab
  • Making fertilisers in industry

Wave properties

  • The nature of waves
  • The properties of waves
  • Reflection and refraction
  • More about waves
  • Sound waves
  • The uses of ultrasound
  • Seismic waves

Electromagnetic waves

  • The electromagnetic spectrum
  • Light, infrared, microwaves, and radio waves
  • Communications
  • Ultraviolet waves, X-rays, and gamma rays
  • x-rays in medicine

 

 

 

Assessment

End of topic tests

Mock exams

End of topic tests

Mock exams

 

 

Year 12 Physics

  • Mechanics and materials
  • Electricity
  • Waves
  • Measurements and their errors
  • Particles and radiation
  • Revision and review

Assessment

 

ACA

 

In class assessment

 

ACA

Year 13 Physics

  • Further mechanics and thermal physics
  • Fields and their consequences
  • Nuclear physics
  • Revision and review
  • Revision and review
  • A Level Exams

Assessment

 

                  Assessment

 

Mocks

 

A Level Exams

Year 12 Chemistry

  • Periodicity
  • Atomic structure
  • Amount of substance
  • Bonding
  • Oxidation reduction and redox equations
  • Group 2, the alkaline earth metals
  • Group 7
  • Organic chemistry
  • Alkanes
  • Halogenoalkanes

 

  • Alkenes
  • Energetics
  • Kinetics

 

  • Alcohols
  • Organic analysis
  • Chemical equilibria and le Chatlier’s principle
  • Thermodynamics
  • Rate equations
  • Equilibrium constant

Assessment

 

ACA

 

In class assessment

 

ACA

Year 13 Chemistry

  •  Acids and bases
  • Optical isomerism
  • Aldehydes and ketones
  • Carboxylic acids and derivatives
  • Aromatic chemistry
  • Amines
  • Polymers
  • Amino acids proteins and DNA
  • Electrode potentials 
  • Transition metals
  • Reactions of ions
  • Properties of period 3
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance
  •  
  • Chromatography
  • Organic synthesis
  • Revision and review
  • Revision and review
  • A Level Exams

Assessment

 

Assessment

 

Mocks

 

A Level Exams

Year 12 Biology

  • Biological molecules
  • Nucleic acids
  • Cells
  • Transport across cell membranes
  • Cell recognition and the immune system
  • Organisms exchange substances with their environment
  • Genetic information variation and relationships between organisms

 

  • Biodiversity
  • Revision and review

Assessment

 

ACA

 

In class assessment

 

ACA

Year 13 Biology

  • Energy transfers in and between organisms
  • Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments
  • Genetics populations, evolution and ecosystems

 

  • The control of gene expression
  • Revision and review
  • Revision and review
  • A Level Exams

Assessment

 

Assessment

 

Mocks

 

A Level Exams