Drama Curriculum Overview, 2019-2020

Why do we teach drama at Ark BDA?

As well as being an enjoyable and active subject for students to study, drama helps to develop an appreciation of character, interpersonal skills, culture, confidence and creativity. Our drama curriculum plan at Ark Burlington Danes is demanding and diverse, and the skills taught can be applied to other academic disciplines, particularly English, media, music, art and the humanities.

How do we deliver our Christian values in drama?

Our Christian values are embedded throughout the drama curriculum. Drama is especially beneficial for developing students’ creative qualities.

Students study a range of topics that teach them compassion and Love. Students also develop commitment skills through group work and realise how much work goes into making a piece of theatre.  Performing in front of your peer's weekly takes courage and instils confidence within our students.  Taking feedback from peers which can be constructive criticism promotes true resilience. In all lessons from Year 7- Year 13 all students have the opportunity to have faith in their own ability and work. They are given opportunities to become leaders through group activities.

How do we build core skills and knowledge over time?

Through KS3 and KS4 students build on their prior knowledge each term, giving them the ability to become a bespoke drama student. Both practical and theory are incorporated into the curriculum to ensure students have the required skill set to achieve.

How does the study of drama prepare students for life beyond Ark BDA?

In drama students develop their confidence, interpersonal skills, empathy and creativity, making them a desirable individual for University or a career of their choice. All the aforementioned are crucial in developing character in our students.

Curriculum implementation

Students study drama for the first time in Year 7 and develop character. In Year 7 students learn the basics of acting through an introductory scheme based on Commedia Dell’ Atre which demonstrates key skills students require to succeed in drama. At KS3 students have one period of drama. Each SOL is relevant, current and relatable for students.

Each SOL offers different drama skills which allow students to develop their knowledge, character, interpersonal skills and confidence. Each topic offers wider questions for students to think about that promote empathy and knowledge to which they can apply to everyday life.

 

KS3 students study a range of set texts and topics which cross over into other subjects at BDA. Through KS3 student’s study three Shakespearian plays; The Tempest, Macbeth and The Taming of the Shrew. Two of which are studied at BDA in English. Students also study a range of topics that are studied in History such as WW1, WW2, The Plague and Slavery. Schemes are based on age groups and are designed to promote empathy, for example in Year 9 students study Homelessness and Hit and Run. 

 

Throughout KS3 students gain the required skills to succeed on the GCSE course. The units studied in Year 10 runs as a mock of Year 11 with an introductory scheme. In the Summer term students start their first component which is worth 40%. In year 11 students have completed their first component and move on to study section A of their Component 3 exam. In Autumn 2 students watch a piece of Live theatre and begin practicing section B of the Component 3 exam. Simultaneously in Autumn 1 and Autumn 2 of Year 11 students are rehearing their C2 practical exam. In Spring 1 Students continue to practise Section A & B of their C3 exam. Between January and March (at the examiners discretion) the examiner will visit and examine C2. Once C2 is completed students move on to studying exam technique.

 

Homework is used in Year 10 to ensure student’s skills, evaluative skills, vocabulary and coursework is completed. In Year 11 homework is used to ensure that students’ exam knowledge and technique is developed to high standard.

 

In year 10 and 11 students are explained the structure of the GCSE course and the order in which it will be delivered.

 

 

 

 

Autumn 1

Autumn 2

Spring 1

Spring 2

Summer 1

Summer 2

 

Year 7

Topic

Slapstick and the Twits

 

The Tempest

 Charlie and the chocolate factory 

 

Performance poetry

 

Time travel

Time travel

Key question

Why is physical theatre important?

Why is narration so important?

Why should you never judge a book by its cover?

How does poetry link to performance?

Why is our past so important to our present?

Why is our present so important to our future?

Content

L1: CC routine, L2: rehearse and perform routine, L3: Double act, L4: Apply to scene from ‘The Twits’, L5: Rehearse for assessment, L6: Perform for assessment.

L1: roles on the ship, L2: Flashback memories, L3: Cross cut, L4: script work, L5: script work continued, L6: rehearse, L7: performance

Understanding key scenes from the play. L1:  themes within the play. L2:  status and thought tracks. L3: Script work. L4: rehearsal. L5: Performance. L6: evaluating.

L1: Introduction to poetry.

L2.  Performing poetry

L3.  Little Red Riding Hood – Roald Dahl’s Revolting Rhymes and using still images.

L4  Still images and improvisation around Little Red Riding Hood.

L5  Responding to poetry and performing

L6 reviewing performances and self-assessing.

Students are reminded of key explorative strategies. Students explore key moment throughout history. These include;

L1: The great fire of London

L2: Guy Fawkes,

 L3:Titanic, L4: evacuees.

L5: assessment

L6: review assessment

L1: Slavery

L2: Thomas Becket

L3: The future

L4 rehearsal

L5 Performance

L6 Review assessment.

 

Assessment

Practical assessment using simplified C2 criteria for practical performance.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment.

Formative assessment to be made weekly on each new skill using the given success criteria.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

End of year exam using the same structure as the Educas C3 exam.

 

Year 8

Topic

Year 8:  Theatre History

 

Year 8 DNA

Year 8: Our Day out

 

Year 8: Mother Courage

 

Year 8: The Wardrobe

 

Year. 8: Teechers

 

Key question

How did the Greek’s influence theatre?

What are the dangers of gangs?

What makes an audience laugh?

What is love?

Why is equality so important?

Why is multirole an essential skill for an actor?

Content

L1: Choral speech,

L2: Greek script

 L3: Melodrama

 L4: perform scenes

 L5: prepare news report

 L6: Perform news report

L1 Power and status

L2 script work

L3 devising from key themes

L4 peer-pressure

L5  rehearsal

L6 performance

L7  review assessment

 

Understanding key scenes from the play. Know how to differentiate characters, status and power. Know how to stage a scene and develop performance skills.

L1 introduction to Willy Russell L2 explorative strategies of key scenes

L3: hot-seating in role

L4 script extract rehearsal 

L5 Performance

 

Developing a good understanding of Brecht and Brechtian theatre. Exploration of key play text.

L1: Good understanding of Brecht and Brechtian theatre. L2.

Exploration of key play text.

L3. Devising from key themes

L4 rehearsal

L 5 assessment

L6 review assessment

Understanding key scenes from the play. Know how to differentiate characters, status and power. Know how to stage a scene and develop performance skills

 

L1 introduction to Sam Holcroft

L2 explorative strategies of key scenes and cross cutting

L3: off-text improvisation  in role

L4 script extract rehearsal 

L5 Performance

Understanding key scenes from the play. Know how to differentiate characters, status and power. Know how to stage a scene and develop performance skills

L1 scene: introduction to Whitehall

L2: The staff room

L 3: Table tennis

L 4: off text improvisation

L5: Performance

Lesson 6:reviewing performances

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year9

Topic

Year 9: Homelessness

 

Year 9: Macbeth

 

Year 9: Hit and Run

 

Year 9 War Horse

 

Year 9: Let Him Have It

 

Year 9: Kitchen Sink Realism

 

Key question

Why are young people homelessness?

How can ambition change the future?

What are the dangers of peer pressure?

Why should you be grateful for what you have?

Is capital punishment justifiable?

How can theatre represent real life?

Content

L:1, Scene exploring reasons why people run away from home,

 L2: Stone cold script

 L3:  News report

 L4: Song

 L5 create piece

 L6: Perform for assessment.

Script work and exploration of dramatic strategies linked to Macbeth.

L1: Still images

L2: script work on status

L3: the witches chant

L4: soliloquy

L5- Macbeth and Banquo meet the witches

L6: Performance

L7:  Review assessment

Students explore a ‘Hit and run’ which focuses around Tony Wells.

1: freeze frames linked to a news report

2.  Thought tracking characters

3: building tension and characterisation

4: devising and marking the moment

5: rehearsal

6: performance

L1. War Horse introduction

L2. Puppet workshop

L2: Narration

L3: script work with puppets

L4: Hot-seating

L5 Rehearsal

L6:  Performance

Students explore the story of Derek Bentley and Christopher Craig and the concept of capital punishment.

1: capital punishment

2: status

3: thought tracking characters linking to stealing

4: rehearsal

5: performance

Understanding a key genre and social movement. Students are able to devise scene in the style of the genre.

1: introduction to Kitchen sink Drama

2-4: devising original Kitchen Sink piece

Assessment

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

Practical assessment using Educas’ C2 marking assessment simplified for each year, becoming more difficult through each term.

End of year exam using the same structure as the Educas C3 exam

 

Year 10

Topic

My famous self

Practitioner skills

War Horse

Theatre review mock for C3

 

Devising Component 1

Evaluating and Portfolio

Key question

What are the different pressures between a modern day celebrity and a War Hero?

Which practitioner best suits your style?

How can puppets be used in theatre effectively?

What are qualities of an outstanding designer?

How does the given stimulus coincide with the given practitioner?

How did you get to your final idea/ designs?

Content

My famous self

This SOW explores different pressures of the modern world has in comparison to pressures during WW2

1: Introduction to GCSE drama

2: peer pressure

3: being famous

4: being a war hero

5: creating a performance

5: using a flashback and cross cut’s effectively.

 

 

Introduction to different theatre practitioners:

1-2: Frantic Assembly

3 Stanislavski

4 Brecht

5 applying a chosen practitioners style to War Horse.

War Horse

Introduction to C3 exam style and set text, War Horse using puppets.

1: scenes 1-3

2: scenes 4-8

3: scenes 8-12

4: scenes 13-15

5 scenes 16-20

1: structure and style

2: exam style questions

3: exploring sound

4: exploring set

5: exploring lighting

6: assessment on Theatre review.

Devising C1

1: introduction to practitioner and stimulus

2: rehearsal

4: rehearsal

5: rehearsal

6: In-class share back 

Portfolio and Evaluation for C1

1: Portfolio and rehearsal

2: Performance of C1

3: Evaluation

4 5 WEX

5: portfolio and evaluation

Assessment

50% In-class practical performance. 

50% written portfolio & evaluation (1,00 words).

 

In-class written exam on theatre practitioners.

C3 style War Horse exam in class.

Theatre review question based on live theatre students have watched.

In-class mock of C1

In-class evaluation completed under examined conditions

 

Year 11

Topic

Warhorse and C2

 

Theatre Review and C2

C2 Exam

War Horse C3 exam

Final exam revision

 

Key question

How does an actor prepare for a given role?

What are the pro’s and con’s of realistic set?

What is your characters objective and how are you portraying this?

How can colour and pattern help set the mood and atmosphere within a scene?

What does a level 9 paper look like?

 

Content

War Horse from a design aspect:

L1, 2, 3: scenes 20-30 of War Horse

L 4-6 preparing C2 texts

 

L1:  theatre review practice on lighting

L2 theatre review practice on sound

L3: C2

L4: theatre review practice on set/ C2 rehearsal

L5 C2 rehearsal

L6 C2 rehearsal

L.1-reviewing mock performance

L2-5- rehearsal on C2 performance

6: dress and Tec of C2 performance.

1: scenes 1-3

2: scenes 4-8

3: scenes 8-12

4: scenes 13-15

5 scenes 16-20

L6: scenes 20-30

Warhorse and Theatre review

L1-3 exploring section A of C3 exam

L3-6

Section B

L7: addressing misconceptions

N/A

Assessment

In-class performance using C2 marking criteria for acting.

In-class presentation on design in War horse.

C2 mock in theatre DP theatre with a shared audience for music events.

Visiting examiner for C2 performance worth 20% of GCSE.

Design based exam style questions in class.

C3 hall exam worth 40% of GCSE